hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

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Sweden

Discover the north

  • A creative nationInnovation & tradition
    in Swedish design
  • Island escapeExperience Stockholms
    best kept secret
  • Roam freeEveryone's free to explore

Drive to the 60's

A recipe for success

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  • Nordic fashion
  • Creative crayfish
  • Equestrian antics
  • Islands of paradise
  • Nordic fashion
  • Creative crayfish
  • Equestrian antics
  • Islands of paradise
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hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

Explore

STOCKHOLM

WORLD OF ISLANDS

Experience Stockholms skärgård

The archipelago extends from Stockholm roughly 60 kilometers to the east. In a north-south direction, it mainly follows the coastline of the provinces Södermanland and Uppland, reaching roughly from Öja island, south of Nynäshamn to Väddö north of Norrtälje. It is separated from Åland by a stretch of water named South Kvarken. A separate group of islands lies further north, near the town of Öregrund. There are approximately 30,000 islands and islets.[1] Some of its more well known islands are Dalarö, Finnhamn, Grinda, Husarö, Ingarö, Isö, Ljusterö, Möja, Nämdö, Rödlöga, Tynningö, Utö, Svartsö and Värmdö.

The biggest towns of the archipelago, apart from Stockholm, are Nynäshamn, Vaxholm and Norrtälje. The village of Ytterby, famous among chemists for naming no fewer than four chemical elements (erbium, terbium, ytterbium and yttrium), is situated on Resarö in the Stockholm Archipelago. The shipping routes from the Baltic to Stockholm pass through the archipelago. There are three main entrances suitable for deep-draught craft, namely, those near Landsort, Sandhamn, and Söderarm. Cruising between the small islands through the Stockholm Archipelago to either Åland or Helsinki in Finland is an experience. Weather allowing, the experience can be enhanced by enjoying a spectacular sunset from the deck that during summer months lasts until 10:30 - 11:00 o’clock at night.

The Island of Finnhamn

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hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

Eat

Smörgåsbord

A buffet with
a difference

A traditional Swedish smörgåsbord consists of both hot and cold dishes. Bread, butter, and cheese are always part of the smörgåsbord. It is customary to begin with the cold fish dishes which are generally various forms of herring, salmon, and eel. After eating the first portion, people usually continue with the second course (other cold dishes), and round off with hot dishes. Dessert may or may not be included in a smörgåsbord.

A special Swedish type of smörgåsbord is the julbord which is the standard Christmas dinner in Sweden. Julbord is a word consisting of the elements jul, meaning Yule (today synonymous with Christmas) and bord, literally table. The classic Swedish julbord is the highlight of Swedish cuisine, a traditional smörgåsbord starting with bread dipped in ham broth and continuing with a variety of fish (salmon, herring, whitefish and eel), ham, small meatballs, head cheese and sausages, potato, boiled or potato casserole, soft and crisp bread, butter and different cheeses, beetroot salad, cabbage (red, brown or green) and rice pudding and beverages.

As with the smörgåsbord, the traditional julbord is typically eaten in three courses. The dishes include local and family specialties. The first course would typically be a variety of fish, particularly pickled herring and lox (gravlax). It is customary to eat particular foods together; herring is typically eaten with boiled potatoes and hard-boiled eggs and is frequently accompanied by strong spirits like snaps, brännvin or akvavit with or without spices. Other traditional dishes would be (smoked) eel, rollmops, herring salad, baked herring, smoked salmon and crab canapés, accompanied by sauces and dips.

  • Salmon with dill and sour cream
  • Prawns, Cucumber and cream
  • Cheese, Mustard and Ham
  • Rye bread and chive
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hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

Evaluate

DESIGN

Beautiful and functional everyday objects should not only be affordable to the wealthy

A core theme in the development of modernism and functionalism, but is probably most completely realised in post-WWII Scandinavian design. The ideological background was the emergence of a particular Scandinavian form of social democracy in the 1950s, as well as the increased availability of new low-cost materials and methods for mass production. Scandinavian design often makes use of form-pressed wood, plastics, anodized or enameled aluminum or pressed steel.

The concept of Scandinavian design has been the subject of many scholarly debates, exhibitions and marketing agendas during the last fifty years, but many of the democratic design ideals that were the central theme of the movement have survived and can be found resonant in contemporary design work by Scandinavian and international designers.

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Ateljé Lyktan

Ateljé Lyktan was founded in 1934 with a focus on producing luminaires for public environments. During the 70's designs such as the Bumling and Supertube brought classic design status to the company. An order of 16,000 luminaires for the Munich Olympic village brought international success to the company.

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Saab

It was formed in 1945 out of Saab AB, a Swedish aerospace and defence company, when Saab AB started a project to design a small automobile. The Saab 92, Saab's first production model, was launched in 1949.

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Folkboat

In 1942 a competition to create a simple low cost boat produced no outright "winner". Taking the best features of the entries, the organisers commissioned Tord Sundén to create a craft that met the goals of the competition. The resulting boat went on to become a success and inspiring yacht designs around the world.

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Ericsson - Cobra

The Ericofon, or cobra, was a plastic one-piece telephone created by the Ericsson Company of Sweden. It was the first commercially marketed telephone to incorporate the dial and handset into a single unit. Because of its styling and its influence on future telephone design, the Ericofon is considered one of the most significant industrial designs of the 20th century.

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hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

Enjoy

Everyone roams free

  • Allemansrätten

    In Sweden the "Allemansrätten" law gives everyone the right to access, walk, cycle, ride, ski, and camp on any land—with some exceptions. So why not take advantage and get out and explore...

  • Kungsleden

    Sweden’s most famous trail, and a knee-jarring 440-km long, much of the Kungsleden ('The Royal Trail') lies above the Arctic Circle. Many hikers also opting to summit Sweden’s highest peak, Kebnekaise (2,117 metres) as part of a week-long route.

  • Tusen Restaurant

    Anyone looking for a place to eat in Sweden's Ramundberget mountains, need not look further than the Tusen Restaurant. Designed by Murman Arkitekter, this beautiful building is a landmark complete with a facade covered in thousands of locally sourced birch logs.

  • Tour in comfort

    Sweden offers drivers a well-maintained network of roads and highways. It is possible to drive the entire length of Sweden from south to north. There are no tolls and traffic jams are rare. The roads are usually in excellent condition, with easy-to-read traffic signs.

  • See the Northern Lights

    An advantage of Sweden’s geographical location in Scandinavia is its proximity to the Arctic Circle, the magnetic north pole, and higher latitudes — 65 to 72 degrees.

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hypermags html5 ezine | Sweden

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